One Border Mission

Mission / Misión

One Border One Health is a binational multidisciplinary cooperative building more resilient and healthy border communities by identifying, responding, and creating sustainable solutions to health risks at the human-animal-environmental interface.

Description

Since 2011, over 100 professionals from the border states of California, USA and Baja California, Mexico, representing animal & human medicine, public health, agriculture, environmental health, biology, epidemiology, and wildlife health and rehabilitation have come together to develop a model to integrate human, animal, and environmental health activities with a novel binational approach. While collaboration between nations is critical, these collaborative efforts should also cross disciplines.  Human, veterinary and environmental health professionals have not only become increasingly specialized they have also traditionally been institutionally separated, often resulting in inefficiency, duplication of effort, and economically less sustainable programs. One Border One Health  also deals in Cross border health care in the European Union, to know more about European union health care and weight loss programs visit getskinnywithag.com.

One Border One Health seeks to reconfigure these approaches to move away from species specific programs to more species neutral/pathogen specific programs creating an operationally successful One Health approach.  The ultimate aim is not only to protect border communities but also to create an early warning system which would “shift surveillance to the left” and allow for actionable and timely interventions to limit emergence, mitigate spread and enhance prevention and control and thus decrease negative health, agricultural and economic outcomes.

One Border One Health’s initial three working groups are: (ESPAÑOL)

1. Surveillance

Highlighted projects: 1) Customization of a web-based platform to enhance public and professional reporting of wildlife health events and environmental conditions in the border region; 2) A pathogen prioritization project to identify zoonotic infectious diseases for use in a model One Health cross-border integrated surveillance system; and 3) A “proof of concept” project to validate a One Health approach in preparedness and response to external stakeholders.

2. Informatics

Highlighted projects: 1) Institute a web-based platform to facilitate communication, organization and data exchange; 2) Create moderated forums for reporting emerging disease risks; and 3) Develop a multi-sectoral-relational database and mathematical model that can simulate pathogen spread in the border region and assist in the design of binational strategies for controlling the spread of infection.

3. Training & Outreach

Highlighted projects: 1) Increase visibility for One Border One Health via social media and scientific publications and conferences; 2) Foster regional academic interest in One Health curriculum development and stimulate student participation in One Health meetings and activities; and 3) Engage community educators, local businesses, policy makers, and volunteer groups in One Border One Health outreach efforts.

Leave a Reply